Author Archives: Katie Holt

INCA Tea Tuesday 11/19 @6:30

The Center for Entrepreneurship invites you to join us on Tuesday, November 19th from 6:30PM-7:30PM in APEX Commons for desserts, discussion, and Ryan Florio, TeaEO of Inca Tea, where he will share how he quit his job at 38 to start a tea company. Inca Tea specializes in teas derived from an ancient Incan recipe that uses antioxidant-rich purple corn.  Ryan started his company with $300 and now sells his teas in Whole Foods, Kroger, Target, Giant Eagle, Earth Fare & Freshthyme.  His brand now includes Inca Tea Cafes and a line of Kombucha called Inca Buch. The event is open to everyone so please share with others.

Curious about the Impeachment Inquiry? Talk Tuesday 11/19 @7

I write to share an invitation from Phi Alpha Theta president Savanna Hitlan:
Dear All,
Hello! I am Savanna Hitlan and I am the President of Phi Alpha Theta (PAT), the history honors society on campus. I wanted to let you all know about an upcoming event co-hosted by PAT and the Political Science Club.
As many of you know, the U.S., for the fourth time in the history of the nation, is currently beginning trials for the impeachment of President Donald Trump. In loom of that, our two clubs have come together to create an event that can help students and faculty alike understand the situation from a historical and political science lens.
Professor Roche (History) and Professor Bas van Doorn (Political Science) have agreed to demonstrate their interpretations of the impeachment trials. They each will give about a six to ten minute synopsis of their points and once both done we will open the floor to any questions that the general audience may have. One person from each of the above clubs will moderate.
If that wasn’t enough, there will also be snacks provided by Spoon.
The event will be held Tuesday, November 19, from 7:00-8:00pm in Kauke 038.
Hope to see you all there!
Thank you,
Have a nice day!
Savanna

Native American Heritage Month

The Center for Diversity and Inclusion invites you to celebrate Native American Heritage Month with our kickoff event this Thursday, November 7 at 7PM in the Andrews Library Core. Join the Native American Indian Center of Central Ohio in learning about native foods and their origins.

Then sit back and relax on November 20 from 11AM to 1PM in the Lowry Pit and enjoy the sounds of Cherokee singer/songwriter Michael Jacobs.

The Painful Hope: An Israeli Settler and a Palestinian Activist in Dialogue Thursday 11/7 @ 7:30

The Painful Hope: An Israeli Settler and a Palestinian Activist in Dialogue, which is free and open to the public. This event will be held on Thursday, November 7th, 7:30 p.m., in Lean Lecture Room of Wishart Hall.

Shadi Abu Awwad – was born into a family of proud Palestinian leaders who were at the helm of the first Palestinian intifada (uprising). Imbued with a deep hatred for Israelis as a child, his family underwent a major transformation and were among the pioneers who reached across the divide to their Jewish neighbors to work together to create a shared vision for their future. Shadi now builds a new generation of Palestinians and Israelis who can confront problems between their communities while acknowledging each other’s shared humanity.

Hanan Schlesinger – is an Orthodox rabbi and teacher, and passionate Zionist settler who was profoundly transformed by his friendship and exchanges with local Palestinians.  His understanding and perceptions of the Middle East conflicts, and of Zionism, have been utterly complicated by his introduction to the parallel universe they share.

Please join Shadi and Hanan and hear their personal, interconnected stories and share the groundbreaking and challenging grassroots work of Roots. They bring their deep conviction that understanding, and trust are the prerequisites for lasting justice, freedom, and peace on the tiny sliver of land they both call home.

Sponsored by: Middle Eastern and North African Studies, the Department of History, the Department of Religious Studies, Global and International Studies and the Office of Religious and Spiritual Life.  Made possible by the Kornfeld Fund.

Dr. Leiby on Central American Immigrants in Rural Ohio 11/5 @7pm

Please join us for this month’s Wooster Science Café next Tuesday,  November 5th from 7-8pm. It will be in the Excelsior Room at Spoon Market & Deli (144 W Liberty St, Wooster). Please come early if you would like to get food and eat before the café and you can bring these upstairs to enjoy during the cafe. There will also be light appetizers provided for free by Spoon. We hope you will come early to mingle.

Michele Leiby,  in Political Science at The College of Wooster, will share the results of a community-based research project on the lives of Central American immigrants in rural Ohio. The discussion will include consideration of the factors driving immigration from Central America to the United States and how U.S. immigration policies impact the lives of immigrants.  It will conclude with consideration of evidence-based strategies for effectively advocating for immigrants’ human rights.

Culture Show logo

Culture Show Sunday 11/2 @7pm

On behalf of International Student Services and the Center for Diversity and Inclusion, please join us as we kick-off International Education Week with our annual Culture Show – Neon Garden.  It is a fun and educational night full of cultural performances that showcase the diverse backgrounds of our student body!  The event will be on Saturday, November 2 from 7:00-9:00pm in McGaw Chapel and is open to the Wooster community free of charge.

We hope to see you there!

Thanks,

International Student Services and the Culture Show Committee

Lecture: Maya Archaeology Thursday 9/26 @7:30

I write to share an announcement from Dr. Navarro-Farr about her upcoming research presentation “Archaeology Beyond our Imagining: Sustainable Practices inside the Maya Biosphere Reserve” on Thursday, September 26 @7: 30pm.  It promises to be a fascinating evening, and I hope to see you there!

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Dear colleagues and OLAS students,

I write to cordially invite you to a forthcoming lecture which will be part of the Archaeology Student Colloquium’s (ASC) annual lecture series. Our speakers will be offering a discussion on the intersections of archaeological research in the present as our team conducts investigations inside the second largest area of tropical rainforest left north of the Amazon. This talk will be a fluid and dual (English and Spanish) language conversation about the challenges and opportunities associated with doing community-centered and collaborative archaeology inside a protected area of high canopy rainforest. I am reaching out to you because this conversation promises to be multidisciplinary and intersectional and I hope you can join us.

Archaeology Beyond our Imagining: Sustainable Practices inside the Maya Biosphere Reserve 

Griselda Pérez Robles – Director of Conservation Proyecto Arqueológico Waka’ (PAW)

Juan Carlos Pérez Calderon – Director Proyecto Arqueológico Waka’ (PAW)

Olivia C. Navarro-Farr – Director Proyecto Arqueológico Waka’ (PAW) & Professor of Anthropology and Archaeology at the College of Wooster

Archaeological research is generally seen as an academic or scientific activity that, after long field or laboratory seasons, provides historical data on the past societies under study. However, archeology goes beyond what we think or imagine; It goes beyond our carefully excavated and registered excavations, vessels or maps. Archaeological research plays an important role in governance, access to decent work, inclusion, conservation and protection of natural and cultural areas. The work carried out by the Proyecto Arqueológico Waka’ (PAW) researchers within the Laguna del Tigre National Park, in the Maya Biosphere Reserve of Petén, Guatemala is academic and scientific. It is also fundamental to the sustained presence of this protected biosphere and the communities which exist in close proximity. The PAW cooperates with other actors in the area to protect the integrity of the natural landscape and to rewrite the ancient history of Guatemalans today.

Date: Thursday, September 26, 2019, 7:30 p.m.

Location: Scovel Hall Room 105